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Posts Tagged ‘best hiring practices’


I don’t get it. I see this time and time again, and I am always baffled by managers who hire people just because they have a pulse and are willing to do the job. This practice is especially common where the position being filled is a low paying, low status job (retail, customer service, etc).  The problem with not carefully choosing employees is that you will constantly have to replace them. Hiring the wrong people causes turnover, lost customers and a whole host of other problems that cost companies a lot of money.

Considering these front line positions actually drive the business, employers need to be especially careful about who they hire. It makes no sense whatsoever to hire people who are not perfectly suited for the work.  Taking the time to look for the right people may be a little painful, but in the long run it will pay off. You’ll have employees who are passionate and dedicated to the company.

Here’s another pearl of wisdom:  If you regard all people who occupy those front line positions as imbeciles, then you will continually hire imbeciles. If you think they are all a bunch of unreliable flakes, then you will hire unreliable flakes. Do you get it? Look for the people you want, not the people you think you will end up with and don’t settle for less.

If you think no one wants to be a CSR or a retail sales guru, think again. I have met many people over the course of my career who simply love being on the front line. The money isn’t what drives them, it’s the challenge of making a customer happy or selling a bunch of merchandise to a customer who was “only browsing”.  These people are out there so there is really no need to hire someone who is clearly not right for the job.

Here are some people you should never hire for a front line position:

  • People who have no relevant experience but have a long employment history. Registered Nurses or Computer Programmers applying for a receptionist position are not suitable candidates. They will leave as soon as they find something in their field of expertise.
  • People who do not present themselves professionally.  Avoid sloppy dressers, people who smell bad, people who look to be of questionable character, people with poor language skills, and people who have no polish whatsoever.
  • People who say, “I just want a job (any job) so I can pay my bills.” These people have no passion for the business or the work they will do. They will only put in enough effort to get a pay cheque and will probably call in sick every chance they get.
  • People who have a history of leaving jobs after only a few months. That’s a no brainer for some. Don’t fool yourself into believing your company will be the one that this person will stick with. The best indicator of future behaviour is past behaviour.
  • People you don’t have rapport with. If you can’t build rapport in a job interview you will not build it later. Employees need to fit in with the culture and they need to be able to relate with their co workers and their boss. If you’re not feeling the love in the interview, don’t hire that person no matter what. Your job as a manager will be infinitely easier if you are working with people you can get along with.
  • People who are not naturally pleasant. This runs along the same line as the above point. You can’t teach people how to be pleasant or happy. If you detect that a job candidate has a certain negative edge to him, then don’t hire him.  He won’t suddenly change and become nice to be around.

Employers should develop a profile of the perfect candidate for the job. Taking the time to figure out what type of person is best suited for the position will help you with your search. Knowing what type of people to avoid will help you even further. Committing yourself to hiring only those who fit the profile will pay off, so be patient and keep trying to find the right people.

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